Emily Selig of Libich Lab, Awarded a Spot on CPRIT Training Grant

CPRIT Logo

 

 

 

Emily Selig recently earned her Ph.D. at the University of Melbourne, Australia where she was employing biophysical and biochemical approaches to investigate the mechanisms by which the small heat-shock proteins aB-crystallin and heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) inhibit protein misfolding and incorporation into amyloid fibrils.

These proteins are ubiquitously expressed chaperone proteins responsible for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and have clinical relevance to a broad range of human diseases including neurodegeneration, cancer, myopathies, and cataracts. Specifically, my research aimed to better elucidate the structure-function relationship of these important regulators of protein homeostasis.

Dr. Selig joined the GCCRI in November 2020 and is working in the laboratory of Dr. David Libich applying her biochemical and biophysical skillset to elucidate the molecular details of how the oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 binds DNA and attracts the machinery required to initiate gene expression. Understanding the details of EWS-FLI1 function is central to determining how this fusion protein alters the cellular genetic program and promotes tumorigenesis in Ewing sarcoma.

As a recipient of the CPRIT training grant, Emily brings a unique biophysical viewpoint to cancer research and she will benefit from the training and interactions with researchers studying the many different aspects of cancer biology.

Learn More Button

 

 

 

Article Categories: News